bookbox I know that for the readers that just love holding the actual paper book in their hands, it is going to take a lot to convince them to change to eBooks. But this week, a recurring dilemma of mine brought home one reason I love them.

An AAR reader mentioned wanting to read an out of print book, but the least expensive copy available is selling for $40.00. As I read the message board post, I realized that I had read the book. Of course that sent me on a hunt for it. Then I realized that, in one of my decluttering modes, I had taken it to the used bookstore. I will probably check with the store tomorrow to see if it’s there for me to buy back. And I have a history of this.

At least seventy five percent of the books I have on my keeper shelf I have purchased at least twice. Typically I buy the book new, then turn it into the used book store, and then purchase it again. I tend to either fall in love with a book and re-read it over and over until I get tired of it, or read it and not think it is a keeper. Of course years later, someone mentions that same book in a way that sparks my curiosity and I just have to re-read it, so there I am buying it again, if I can find it. I have spent years looking for a certain book again.

If I recall correctly, I purchased Nora Roberts’ series books three times. I did the same thing with some Georgette Heyer books. A few years ago, I purchased hardbacks of a certain author, sold the books to our local bookstore, and then ended up buying my books back a year later.

While I am sure I will delete some eBooks, simply taking the book off my device fills the need to eliminate the clutter, but with my Kindle the book stays on my account. So if in two years, I decide I want to read the book again, I won’t have to go hunting for it or even buy it again. And hopefully in the future, I can loan it out to a friend. In the meantime, please tell me I am not the only person that I has bought multiple copies of the same books over and over.

– Leigh Davis