1) You were published prior to Bantam by ImaJinn. What was your publishing strategy initially, and was it your goal to get picked up by a major print publisher such as Bantam?

When ImaJinn picked up Dancing with the Devil, the first of my paranormal romances, I was simply glad to have finally found a venue for my writing, and a publisher who believed in me. At that time, para romance wasn’t as popular as it is now, and I’d been getting a whole lot of rejections from major NY publishers.

I always wanted to be NY published though, and never stopped hoping to write that ‘break through’ book that would get me there.

2) According to your website, you had an erotic paranormal romance novella published by ImaJinn earlier this year. Do you plan to continue w/them, or solely with Bantam in the future?

 

I definitely plan to continue with ImaJinn. I love the books I have there, and I learned so much from my ImaJinn editor. I’m hoping to release one book (or novella) a year with them, though at the moment, with my Bantam deadlines, that may stretch out a little.

3) Please describe Urban Fantasy to me, and the authors who influenced you in this arena. Do you consider your Riley Jenson books to be Urban Fantasy or Paranormal Romance?

I’ve always considered urban fantasy to be fantasy elements in a modern, urban environment. I don’t know that I’ve had any direct influences in the urban fantasy area, though. The only one I can really think of is Mecedes Lackey’s Children of the Night. I read that, and said, “that’s exactly what I’m trying to do–and there is a market for it!” And of course, then Laurell K Hamilton came along and proved just how much of a market there actually was. If I was going to name influences, then I’d have to say Dick Francis, James Herbert and Stephen King, simply because I love the way each of those writers suck you into a story and make you care.

I’ve always considered the Riley Jenson series to be Dark Urban fantasy

4) The covers for your Riley Jenson books in the U.S. differ greatly from those in the U.K. Which do you prefer, and why?

 

I think each cover is designed for its market, but if I had to name a favourite, then I’d say the US covers. I love the look and feel of them, and think they give a very good indication of what the series is about

5) The cover of your second book referred to you as the “rising star in paranormal romance”. Now, *I* don’t think your books are romances – I think they’re Urban Fantasies – but what did you think about it, and were you concerned that romance readers who weren’t expecting it would be bothered by the multiple partners and lack of a traditional HEA?

Well, I do write paranormal romances, and it’s nice to be considered a rising star <g>

But I don’t consider the Riley books romance. They’re dark urban fantasy with a strong romantic theme that’s drawn out across the series. And I was worried when it was decided to market them as romance, but, as an author, you have to trust your publisher. And I think Bantam did a great job with the blurbs and the covers, which really gave the reader a good indication of the series direction.

Which isn’t saying there wasn’t backlash. There’s always going to be when the conventions of any genre is broken and people are disappointed. But Riley will get her HEA eventually–the romance writer in me wouldn’t have it any other way.

6) Forgive me if I got this wrong, or if I can’t explain it well, but there seems to be a hierarchy among shapeshifters in your books. Unless I’ve got the wrong series, and I don’t think I do, what is the difference between a shapeshifter and a werewolf? Obviously some shifters are bears or horses or wolves, but why is a shapeshifter higher up the food chain than a werewolf?

 

 

The difference between a shifter and a were (in Riley’s world) is the fact that a were is governed by the moon, and must change shape with the full moon. They can shift at other times, of course, but the full moon gives them no choice. Shifters aren’t governed by the moon, and aren’t effected by the moon heat or forced to changed.

Over all, shifters and weres of the same species stand at the same level. One is not higher than the other in the food chain. It’s just that some shifters (like the wolf shifters) think they’re better than the weres because they are not at the mercy of their hormones during the week before the full moon.

I’m new to Facebook and involved right now in an argument w/a rabid bunch of college age men and men in their 20s. There is a “werewolf” application but the associated icon looks like the 60s “B movie” version of a werewolf – you know, half wolf, half man. I proposed there be another icon for users to try if they want to; an actual wolf…whether it’s got a fox in its mouth or not, I don’t care. When YOU picture a werewolf, do you see a wolf in your mind or a half-man/half-wolf?

 

I see a proper wolf. Never did like those half man-half wolf versions. There’s nothing sexy in becoming a big hairy human <g>

weres can sense other weres, so she’d be able to scent the difference between a rabbit and a were rabbit. :)

 

Oh…another “fun” one… this time from my husband. We’ll get back to the official questions afterward. When in wolf form, let’s say Riley went out to catch rabbits. What if one of them was a wererabbit?

weres can sense other weres, so she’d be able to scent the difference between a rabbit and a were rabbit. :)

 

Oh…another “fun” one… this time from my husband. We’ll get back to the official questions afterward. When in wolf form, let’s say Riley went out to catch rabbits. What if one of them was a wererabbit?

 

 

TTFN, as Tigger said to Winnie the Pooh,
Laurie Likes Books, with Keri Arthur

 

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