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And The Award Goes To… Challenge
No Country for Old Men (2007) — Read a romance in which one or both of the lead characters is older than 40 (I know that’s not old); Read a romance set in the American west, whether an historical or contemporary.
Love is Lovelier by Jean Brasher — heroine is 62, hero is 65:
The heroine was the widowed mother of three of the previous books’ heroines. She and the hero had both rebelled against their mothers’ wish for them to marry decades before, each eventually marrying other people. Despite her daughters’ wishes, the heroine was ready to resume work after suffering a mild heart attack. The bad guy continued his campaign of sabotage while moping and complaining in his POV scenes. There were also POV scenes from two additional villains who came across as cartoonish. The hero was determined to help the heroine with her financial woes, but stupidly tried to keep it a secret from her. He contemplated how much he admired her business acumen one moment and wanted to wrap her in cotton wool the next. Rinse and repeat, which was extremely frustrating. Since one honest conversation would have cleared up most of the conflict he didn’t grovel nearly enough once the truth came out. Then the heroine ended up apologizing to him which was ridiculous. There were issues in the overarching suspense plot, but they can’t really be blamed on this particular book as it was more a result of the series’ structure. The heroine was supposedly a great businesswoman but we’re only told this not shown. I wish we’d seen more of her interacting with her four daughters on page, particularly her eldest. I also wish the hero’s daughter had been a more developed character. It’s a shame she wasn’t one of the later books’ heroines as I would have liked to read her story. An uneven read, but I enjoyed parts.

The Alphabet Challenge Variation
I = Unmasked by Ingrid Weaver:
The heroine was the eldest daughter of the heroine in the previous book. The ridiculous overarching suspense plot finally came to a conclusion. It had too many plot holes to take seriously and they got bigger in each of the previous books, particularly the financial aspects. While not all the fault of this particular author it nonetheless detracted from the story. We again had too many POV scenes from several of the villains, but at least most of them got their just desserts. The h/h had been high-school sweethearts, but differing life goals had driven them apart. I’ve liked the heroine since her appearance in the first book so was happy to finally read her story. The hero was extremely pushy. His behavior was obviously only for plot purposes, but it was still annoying. The resolution to the subplot about his injured hand was dubious. An uneven read, but the heroine made the book work. While I’m happy the overarching suspense plot concluded, with four books remaining in this series I’m wondering how they will connect. Overall I wanted to like this book more than I did,

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