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  • Maggie Boyd Maggie Boyd
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    Post count: 49
    #68956 |

    Here’s my first submission for the 2018 Reading Challenge:

    Dance!
    Read 1 8(or 10 or 12) books that match the criteria listed within the challenge to complete it.
    1. Square Dance – Associated with the romantic image of the American Cowboy. Read a Western Romance. (Cowboy, ranchers, you name it -if it’s associated with the American West it works!)
    2. Watermelon Crawl – A country line dance made famous by the Tracy Byrd song. Read a small-town romance or a book that takes place at a fair.
    3. Tango (Chase)– An elegant, stylized dance often associated with danger. Read a romantic suspense novel or romance involving a mystery of some kind.
    4. Waltz – A ballroom dance. Read a Regency or European historical romance
    5. Boogie-Woogie – A form of swing dance popularized in the 30s/40s. Read a novel that takes place in the 30s/40s
    6. Pole Dance – This dance is meant to inspire desire. Read a hot romance.
    7. Quickstep- The movement of the dance is fast and powerfully flowing and sprinkled with unexpected rhythms. Read a romance involving someone doing fancy footwork, like a thief, con-man, ad man, lawyer etc.
    8. The Lindy Hop – A type of swing dance named after Charles Lindbergh who “hopped” across the Atlantic. Read a romance about someone who travels a lot for a living (pilot, war correspondent etc.) or where a trip is central to the story.
    9. Salsa – A Cuban dance whose origins began with Latin Jazz. Read a romance that takes place in the Caribbean or that has an h/h from that area or since the dance is often associated with Miami, read a book that takes place in Florida.
    10. Rumba – There is a famous scene in the I Love Lucy show (Season 1, Episode 3) where Lucy is dressed in a Carmen Miranda outfit. It is typically referred to as Lucy’s Rumba and has inspired everything from Christmas Ornaments to Postcards. In honor of that moment, read a humorous romance.
    11. Jitterbug – a type of swing dance, made popular by Cab Calloway’s 1934 recording of “Call of the Jitter Bug” (Jitterbug) and the film “Cab Calloway’s Jitterbug Party”. It actually refers to someone who is high from alcohol or drugs and has “the jitters” as a result. Read a book about a bar tender or someone who works in a bar, a novel that takes place in a bar or that involves alcohol in some significant way or read a book about a recovered alcoholic/ drug addict or that involves an intervention.
    12. Polka – a popular folk dance from Eastern Europe. Read a book that takes place in Eastern Europe or where the h/h are descended from Eastern Europeans.
    13. March – Marches are associated with soldiers; read a military romance.
    14. Jive – Jive is a type of swing dance associated with jazz music. Jive talking is to speak in an exaggerated, teasing, or misleading way. Read a book with an h/h who is in politics or a profession where the truth is exaggerated.
    15. Tap dance – Children are often taught how to tap at an early age. Read a book where the h/h are single parents or a book that involves a pregnancy in some way.
    16. Ballet – Ballets often tell epic stories. Read an epic romance or a book with high drama.
    17. Break dancing – Athletic style of street dancing. Read a book about an h/h who are into sports.
    18. Electric boogaloo- a funk style of hip hop dance closely related to popping. African American pop culture has given us many, many different dances of which this is just one. Read a book with an h/h who are African American.
    19. Moonwalk – dance move in which the dancer moves backwards while seemingly walking forwards. Read a science fiction or fantasy book.
    20. Rain Dance – many Native American dances involved evoking blessings. Read a novel with a Native American character or a book that significantly involves a weather event (flood, fire etc.)
    21. Hokey Pokey – One of the earliest dances most Americans learn, often used in schools for indoor play or gym class. Read a novel about a teacher or someone who works in education.
    22. Macarena – This fun song/dance deals with a cheating girlfriend. Read a book that has a cheating plot or where the h/h had a cheating previous partner.
    23. Bharatanatyam – a classical dance from the South Indian state of Tamil Nadu, practiced predominantly in modern times by women. Read a novel that takes place in India.
    24. Belly dancing – associated with the Middle East. Read a novel set in the Middle East or with Middle Eastern characters.
    25. Charleston – This extremely popular dance type was popularized by famous tune called “The Charleston” by composer and pianist James P. Johnson. Read a book that takes place in the American South, where Charleston is located.
    26. Merengue – a type of lively, joyful music and dance that comes from the Dominican Republic. Merengue means whipped egg whites and sugar in Spanish, similar to the English word meringue. Read a book that involves a baker or cook.
    27. Flash dance – a form of tap dance that evolved in the 1920s–1930s, which combined dance with acrobatics. Read a book that takes place in a short span of time.
    28. Long Dance- Native American Dance celebration held on California’s Central Coast in San Luis Obispo County. Read a book that is 400+ pages or a book that covers a long time period (over a year). Or a book that has two separate time line stories like many S. Brockman novels or Suzanna Kearsley or Simone St. James books.
    29. Monster Mash – The song is narrated by a mad scientist whose monster, late one evening, rises from a slab to perform a new dance. The dance becomes “the hit of the land” when the scientist throws a party for other monsters. Read a paranormal romance.
    30. Highland Fling – a solo Highland dance that gained popularity in the early 19th century. Read a Scottish romance.
    31. Angle Dance – A Robert Plant song/lullaby. Read an Inspirational romance.
    32. Mambo Italiano- In the movie by this name a young Canadian Immigrant struggles to find a way to tell his parents he is gay. Read a LGBTQ romance.
    33. Mambo Number Five – Lou Bega’s song and dance is all about switching partners. Read a book that involves second chance at love or a ménage/multi-partner romance.
    34. Twist – Chuck Berry invited us to twist the night away, a dance that involves the feet grinding back and forth on the floor. Sounds easy but like the hula-hoop this can be hard to master. Read a book which involves a surprising plot twist, such as where the heroine thinks the hero guilty of a crime.
    35. The Chicken (Funky Chicken) – a popular rhythm and blues dance started in America in the 1950s, in which the dancers flapped their arms and kicked back their feet in an imitation of a chicken. Chicken soup is what we give those who are ill. Read a medical romance.
    36. “The Time Warp” – a song featured in the 1973 rock musical The Rocky Horror Show and in its 1975 film adaptation The Rocky Horror Picture Show, as well as a dance performed during the chorus of the song. Read a time travel romance.
    37. River Dance – the dance sensation that swept a nation, this is an Irish folk dance. Read an Irish romance.
    38. Bolero – one of the competition dances in American Rhythm ballroom dance category. Read a book about a bet or some other type of competition (i.e. The Hating Game – two characters vying for the same job).
    39. Cha-Cha (Cha-Cha-Cha) “Optimist: Someone who figures that taking a step backward
    after taking a step forward is not a disaster, it’s a cha-cha.” Robert Brault Read a romance with a Pollyanna type character or read a book where the h/h are forced to return home for some reason.
    40. Read a book with a dance word in the title, such as Pamela Morsi’s Last Dance at Jitterbug Lounge or a book with a dancing couple on the cover.
    41. Free style – Whatever book you want.

    Library addict library addict
    Participant
    Post count: 45

    The Alphabet Challenge
    R is the 18th letter of the alphabet. Read 10 or 18 books where the title or author’s name begins with the letter R.

    The Alphabet Challenge Variation
    Variation read 18 books where the title/author name begins with the letter A, then B, C, etc. through R.

    The 21st Century Challenge
    Read 18 books, one per year published in 2001, 2002 through 2018

    The 20th Century Challenge
    Read 18 books, one per year published in 2000, 1999 back through 1983

    The 18 in 18 Phonics Challenge
    Read 10 or 18 books which fit the following categories:

    • E for entertainment — Read a romance where the heroine and/or hero works in the entertainment industry, e.g. actor, musician, director, make-up artist, producer, etc.
    • I for interconnected — Read a romance that is part of a series.
    • G for goal — Read a romance in which the heroine and/or hero is involved with sports, e.g. athlete, coach, team owner, etc.
    • H for health — Read a romance where the heroine and/or hero is involved with the health services industry, e.g. doctor, nurse, paramedic, physical therapist, etc.
    • T for transfigure — Read a romance where the heroine and/or hero has the ability to shift into an animal.
    • E for education — Read a romance where the heroine and/or hero is involved with education, e.g. teacher, principal, school counselor, etc.
    • E for Europe — Read a romance set in Europe.
    • N for name — Read a romance where the heroine and/or hero’s name begins with the letter R (the 18th letter of the alphabet).
    • I for inspirational — Read an inspirational romance.
    • N for new — Read a romance by a debut author or a romance by any author you haven’t read before. Or read a New Adult romance.
    • E for everyman — Read a romance with a blue-collar heroine and/or hero.
    • I for ignite — Read a “hot” or erotic romance. Or read a romance where the heroine and/or hero is a fireman.
    • G for gourmet — Read a romance in which the heroine and/or hero is a chef, baker, caterer, etc, or owns a restaurant, diner, bakery, etc.
    • H for holiday — Read a romance set during Valentine’s Day, Thanksgiving, Christmas time, or any other holiday.
    • T for time — Read a futuristic or time-travel romance.
    • E for East Asia — Read a romance set in Japan, China, Hong Kong, North Korea, South Korea, Taiwan, or Mongolia.
    • E for epic — Read a fantasy romance.
    • N for news — Read a romance where the heroine and/or hero is involved with the news industry, e.g. reporter, anchor, newspaper editor, etc.
    • C for critter — Read a romance where the heroine and/or hero have a pet.
    • H for historical — Read an historical romance.
    • A for Australasia — Read a romance set in Australia, New Zealand, or the neighboring islands.
    • L for laughter — Read a humorous romance.
    • L for law — Read a romance in which the heroine and/or hero is involved with the law, e.g. lawyer, judge, police, politician, etc.
    • E for equestrian — Read a romance that features horses.
    • N for neighbor — Read a romance where the heroine and hero are neighbors or a romance where they grew up together.
    • G for guardian — Read a romance where the heroine and/or hero is on active duty with a military, naval, police, or fire-fighting organization. Or read a romance where the heroine and/or hero is a parent.
    • E for enigma — Read a mystery romance or romantic suspense.
    • This reply was modified 1 week, 3 days ago by Library addict  library addict.
    • This reply was modified 1 week, 3 days ago by Library addict  library addict. Reason: fix coding
    • This reply was modified 1 week, 3 days ago by Library addict  library addict.
    • This reply was modified 1 week, 3 days ago by Library addict  library addict.
    Maggie Boyd Maggie Boyd
    Participant
    Post count: 49

    The Jingle Challenge
    If you grew up in the 20th century, there was a song selling just about every product under the sun. Read 10,12 or 18 books that match the criteria within the challenge to complete it.

    1. When You Say Bud You’ve Said It All – (Budweiser) Read a friends to lovers romance or a romance where the h/h have known each other a long time.
    2. The Best Part of Waking Up (Folgers)- Read a book about a coffee barista, café worker/owner, or h/h who are in the food industry in some way.
    3. Like a Good Neighbor – Read a small town romance or a story where the h/h return home.
    4. Libbys, Libbys, Libbys On The Label, Label, Label (Libbys canned goods) Read a book where the h/h are farmers, ranchers or work with groceries in some capacity. British nobles often had home farms with their property, which would count.
    5. I’d Like to Teach The World To Sing (Coke)– Read a romance where the h/h work with music in some capacity or a book with song name/lyrics in the title.
    6. Five Dollar Foot Long (Subway) – Read a hot romance or a romance where the h/h are well endowed.
    7. Meow Meow Meow Meow (Meow Mix) Read a book that involves animals in some way.
    8. Stuck on Bandaid (Bandaid) – Read a book where the h/h work in medicine in some capacity.
    9. Two all beef patties special sauce lettuce cheese pickles onions on a sesame seed bun (McDonald’s) McDonald’s is the king of fast food restaurants. Read a book about h/h in a high powered career or a book where the h/h are titled nobility.
    10. Wouldn’t You Like To Be A Pepper Too? (Dr. Pepper) Read a book where the h/h are described as sassy, sarcastic, opinionated etc. or a book where the h/h belong to something (band, motorcycle gang etc.)
    11. I Don’t Want to Grow Up, I’m a Toys R Us Kid – Read a book about single parent(s) or a book that involves children in some way (i.e. h/h are teachers, social workers etc.)
    12. Gimme a Break (Kit-Kat) Read a second chance at love story or a reunion romance
    13. There’s Nothing Like the face (of a kid eating a Hershey Bar, Hershey) – The great American chocolate bar. It all began with a visit to Hershey by Captain Paul P. Logan of the US Army Quartermaster Corps in 1937, as America drifted closer to war. Samuel Hinkle, Hershey’s chief chemist at the time and a future company president, said Logan asked Hershey to develop “a kind of survival ration.” The resulting chocolate bar, with greater nutritional value and a higher melting point than usual, was the beginning of what came to be called a D Ration. Read a romance with a veteran or where the h/h are in the military.
    14. Hot Dogs, Armour Hotdogs (Armour Hotdogs) to be a hotdog is to perform unusual or very intricate maneuvers in a sport or to perform in a reckless or flamboyant manner. Read a sports romance.
    15. (I wish I was an) Oscar Mayer Weiner (Oscar Mayer) – Hopefully most of us have higher aspirations than being a hotdog! Read a book where the h/h are starting a new career or work in their dream job. Or since the lyrics include “so everyone would be in love with me” read a romance where the h/h is popular, famous, or infamous.
    16. My baloney has a first name (Oscar Mayer Bologna) – Read a romance that involves a family name, such as the MacGregor Saga by Nora Roberts or a romance that includes a name in the title such as Searching for Irene, The Charming Lady Charlotte etc.
    17. We love baseball, hotdogs, apple pie and Chevrolet (Chevrolet) – Read a romance that involves cars/motorcylces/vehicles in some capacity. Or since this is meant to describe American life, read a romance that takes place in America.
    18. Plop, plop fizz, fizz oh what a relief it is (Alka Seltzer) Alka Seltzer is all about solving a problem. Read a romantic suspense book.
    19. Have a coke and a smile (Coca Cola) – Read a book where the h/h works in a profession where smiles are important such as dentist, model or actor.
    20. Sometimes you feel like a nut, sometimes you don’t (Peter Paul Almond Joy/Mounds) Read a humorous romance or a romance that takes place in a tropical location.
    21. Double, double your refreshment (doublemint gum) These ads involved twins. Read a book where the h/h have a twin or read several connected books about siblings.
    22. Smack dab in the middle (Chewels) Read the second book in a trilogy or any book that is in the middle of a series.
    23. I want my baby back ribs (Chillis) – Read a book that involves a secret baby or unplanned pregnancy.
    24. Mmm, Mmm Good (Campbell’s Soup) Read an award winning romance.
    25. Head for the Mountains (Busch Beer) Read a book where the h/h work in a bar or with alcohol in some way.
    26. I can bring home the bacon, fry it up in a pan (Enjoli) Read a book where the heroine’s independent nature is a definitive aspect of her character. (I.e. suffragette, devoted to her career, refuses to marry because she doesn’t want to give up her independence etc.)
    27. Just one calorie, now you see it, now you don’t (Diet Pepsi) – Read a romance that has ghosts or spirits.
    28. Meet the Swinger, the Polaroid Swinger (Polaroid Cameras) Read a romance with multiple partners or where the h/h have a second chance at love.
    29. Just One Cornetto – Give it to me!’ (British Ice Cream Ad) Read a romance set in England or a romance that involves cold weather in some way.
    30. Snickers satisfies you – Be satisfied with your reading choices. This is a wild card to be used for any type of book.
    31. Fruity Oaty Bar! Commercial (Serenity Movie) – A song that triggers an assassin. Read a sci-fi/fantasy/paranormal romance.
    32. Last beer to have when you’re having more than one (Schafer beer) H/h is recover(ed)ing addict or works with addiction in some way
    33. Tonight is Kind of Special (Lowenbrau) – One night stand romance or cabin/road trip romance.
    34. From the Land of Sky Blue Waters (Hamms) – A book that takes place on or near the water, or has something to do with water on the cover/title.
    35. You can wear a ring around your finger (Ring Pop) – a book revolving around a wedding or with bride/wedding in the title or a book with a fake engagement.
    36. The world looks mighty good to me cause tootsie rolls are all I see (Tootsie Roll) Whatever it is I think I see, becomes a tootsie roll to me: Read a book that involves amnesia, mistaken identity/false identity or witness protection etc.
    37. Fresh goes better (Mentos) Read a book about fresh starts – new career, new location, makeover etc.
    38. Kiss a little longer, Give your breath long lasting freshness (Big Red) Read a long romance (400+ pages) or a romance that takes place over a year or more or a romance that has story lines in two different time periods or where the plot is affected by events of the past.
    39. Thingamabob, gooblygook, what’s it face (Whatchamacallit Candy Bar) – Any type of romance you want.
    40. The taste is gonna move you (Juicy Fruit) Read a book where the h/h has a passion (environment, politics, working with needy) or read an Inspirational romance.

    Maggie Boyd Maggie Boyd
    Participant
    Post count: 49

    Defining Love
    Mankind has looked for the true meaning of love for centuries. Below are some quotes that offer a glimpse of what it means. Read 10,12 or 18 books that match the criteria within the challenge to complete it.
    1. Love is friendship that has caught fire ( Anne Landers ) Read a friends to lovers romance.
    2. Love is the answer, (John Lennon) Read a mystery/romantic suspense.
    3. Love is a flower, you’ve got to let it grow. (John Lennon) Read a book about a landscaper, florist or farmer. Or about someone who works in the outdoors in some way.
    4. Love is higher than a mountain (Bee Gees) Read a book that takes place in Montana or Colorado or any other area known for their mountains.
    5. Love is deeper than water (Bee Gees) Read a book that takes place on a ship or that involves water in some way. (i.e. body of water in the title such as Friday Harbor by Lisa Kleypas)
    6. Love is like an hourglass, with the heart filling up as the brain empties. (Jules Renard) Read a time travel romance.
    7. Love is stronger than death (Robert Fulghum) Read a vampire romance or another type of paranormal or read a romance that involves a significant death. (Ie married because it is required in a will such as in Mary Balogh’s Slightly Married)
    8. True love is like ghosts, which everyone talks about and few have seen. (Francois de La Rochefoucauld) Read a story with ghosts or spirits
    9. Life is a game and true love is a trophy. (Rufus Wainwright) Read a sports romance or a book that involves a competition of some kind.
    10. Love recognizes no barriers. It jumps hurdles, leaps fences, penetrates walls to arrive at its destination full of hope. (Maya Angelou) Read an across the tracks romance or where the h/h overcome a significant barrier (class, religion, etc.)
    11. Love is like a virus. It can happen to anybody at any time. (Maya Angelou) Read a medical romance or a romance that involves someone who works in the medical industry.
    12. Love is a friendship set to music. (Joseph Campbell) Read a book where the h or h are musicians or read a novel with a title based on song lyrics/song title. (Earls Just Wanna Have Fun etc.)
    13. Love is a better teacher than duty. (Albert Einstein) Read a book about a teacher/educator
    14. God is Love (Apostle John) Read an Inspirational romance.
    15. We are born of love; Love is our mother. (Rumi) Read a book about a single mother.
    16. Love is an ice cream sundae, with all the marvelous coverings. Sex is the cherry on top. (Jimmy Dean) Read a book about a sweet maker (baker, candy maker, cook) or with sweet(s) being mentioned in the title in some way.
    17. Where we love is home – home that our feet may leave, but not our hearts. (Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr. ) Read a small town romance or a book where the h/h are forced to return home for some reason.
    18. Love is the silent saying and saying of a single name. (Mignon McLaughlin) Read a book with someone who works with words for a living (writer, lawyer, reporter, TV host) or with a family name in the title (ie Nora Robert’s The MacGregors) or with a name in the title (ie: Searching for Irene, The Charming Lady Charlotte).
    19. Love is a smoke made with the fume of sighs. (William Shakespeare) Read a firefighter romance or a book involving a fire in some way.
    20. Love is not to be purchased, and affection has no price. (St. Jerome) Read a book with a wealthy h/h or where someone needs to marry for money.
    21. Love is an irresistible desire to be irresistibly desired. (Robert Frost) Read a “hot” romance.
    22. Mature love is composed and sustaining; a celebration of commitment, companionship, and trust. (H. Jackson Brown, Jr. ) Read a book with an older h/h
    23. Love is a battle, love is a war; (James A Baldwin) Military romance or a book that takes place during a war time period.
    24. Love is a growing up. James A. Baldwin Read a YA romance.
    25. Love takes off masks that we fear we cannot live without and know we cannot live within.(James A. Baldwin) Read a book that involves a deception or dishonesty in some way.
    26. Love many things (Vincent Van Gogh) Read a second chance at love story.
    27. Love is a canvas furnished by nature and embroidered by imagination. (Voltaire) Read a book about artists or people who use their imagination in some way for a living.
    28. Love is chemical (Lou Reed) Read a book with a scientist or involving science in some way.
    29. Love is an exploding cigar we willingly smoke. (Lynda Barry) Read a lighthearted/comedic romance.
    30. Since love grows within you, so beauty grows. For love is the beauty of the soul. (Saint Augustine) Read a beauty/beast themed romance.
    31. Love is love. Read an LGBTQ romance.
    32. Love is in the Air In the movie Strictly Ballroom the main couple dance to this at the end. Read a book that involves dancing in some way, has the name of a dance on the cover or that has a dancing couple on the cover.
    33. Love is a Song – from the movie Bambi – read a book about a singer or a novel that involves animals in some way.
    34. Love is (comic strip) These comics involved two often naked lovers telling us what love was/is all about. Read a book about a stripper, a writer, or someone who works with comics in some way.
    35. Love is the absence of judgement (Dali Lama) Read a book about a judge or where h/h is involved with law enforcement in some way.
    36. I want to know what love is (Foreigner song) Wildcard – any book you want.
    37. Find your own quote about love that matches the book you are reading and share it with us!

    Library addict library addict
    Participant
    Post count: 45

    Also the usual (though I think Easy Eighteen rather than Simply Eighteen to keep with the alliteration).

    Easy Eighteen Challenge (The Whittler)
    Read any 10 or 18 books from your TBR pile

    Maggie Boyd Maggie Boyd
    Participant
    Post count: 49

    The Shoe Challenge: Many say it is a woman’s favorite accessory: . Read 10,12 or 18 books that match the criteria within the challenge to complete it
    1. ALMOND TOE A shoe style which features a softly rounded, tapered pointed toe. Read a book where the h/h works with food in some way.
    2. ATHLEISURE Fashion sportswear that is inspired by both athletic and leisure elements. Read a book where the h/h work in the leisure industry (hotel, vacation planner, tour guide etc)
    3. BABY BOOTIES – Quite possibly the sweetest shoe on earth. Read a book about a secret baby or a book involving a pregnancy.
    4. BALLET SLIPPERS – Read a book where the h/h are dancers or where there is a dance word in the title.
    5. BOAT SHOES A flat shoe designed with a rubber sole that offers good traction on slippery boat decks, often made from leather or canvas. Read a book that involves water in some way (h/h are sailors, water in the title, takes place near a lake/river etc.)
    6. BOWLING SHOES – At the start of the 21st century bowling alleys had problems with patrons stealing shoes as they became a fashion trend. Read a novel published in or taking place in the 21st Century.
    7. CHELSEA BOOT A type of pull-on ankle-height boot featuring elastic gussets. America’s most famous Chelsea is the daughter of two politicians. Read a book about a politician, a politician’s child or that involves politics in some way.
    8. CLEATS – An athletic shoe. Read a sports romance.
    9. CLOG -Clogging is the official state dance of Kentucky and North Carolina and was the social dance in the Appalachian Mountains as early as the 18th century. Read a book that takes place in the Appalachian area.
    10. COMBAT BOOTS Lace up multipurpose boots originally designed for the military. Read a military romance.
    11. COWBOY BOOTS -Read a Western romance or a book where the h/h is a farmer/rancher
    12. CROCS- a summer shoe. Read a book that takes place in summer.
    13. DESIGNER SHOES – Read a book where the h/h is wealthy.
    14. ESPADRILLE – A shoe or sandal that has a woven rope or similar material covering the wedge or sole. Espadrilles have been made in Occitania region (France), in the Pyrennean regions of Basque country (France – Spain) and Catalonia (Spain), since the 14th century at least, and there are shops in the Basque country (France – Spain) still in existence that have been making espadrilles for over a century. Read a book that takes place in France or Spain or has French/Spanish characters or a book that uses a French or Spanish word in the title.
    15. FLIP FLOPS -The ultimate casual, contemporary shoe. Read a contemporary romance.
    16. GALOSH -Waterproof footwear designed to be worn over other shoes or boots in wet weather. Read a book that takes place in a location known for their rain, such as India (monsoons), a jungle, England, Washington state in the U.S.
    17. GLADIATOR – Designed to resemble the shoes worn by ancient Roman fighters. Read a book about a boxer or other style of fighter, about a competition or bet, or about ancient Rome.
    18. HIDDEN WEDGE – A wedge-shaped heel hidden inside a boot or shoe. Read a book that revolves around a secret, a mystery or mistaken/hidden identity or read a romantic suspense novel.
    19. HIGH IN THE INSTEP – Read a book about a proud h/h.
    20. HIGH TOPS – Read a book where the h/h has achieved success.
    21. INSOLE Like the soul of a man, this inner part of a shoe that touches the bottom of the foot, is hidden within. Read an Inspirational Romance.
    22. KID SLIPPERS – Regency era shoe. Read a Regency romance. Or read a book involving children in some way.
    23. KITTEN HEEL A low-heeled stiletto shoe, often between 1 and 2 inches in heel height. Read a hot or sexy romance.
    24. MARY JANE – Read a book with a name in the title, that is part of a series based on siblings/family members or that involves young girls in some way.
    25. MOCASSIN – Read a Native American Romance or a romance that takes place in the Colonial/Revolutionary War period of the U.S.
    26. MOTORCYCLE BOOTS – Read a motorcycle club romance or read a romance where the h/h works with vehicles in some way (truck driver, mechanic, etc.)
    27. MULES – A shoe or sandal characterized by a closed, or nearly closed, toe and a backless heel of any height. Read a book involving animals.
    28. OXFORD – An Oxford shoe is characterized by shoelace eyelets tabs that are attached under the vamp,[1] a feature termed “closed lacing. Read a book about a vampire or another paranormal romance. Or read a book that takes place in England, home to Oxford University. Or read a book that takes place in or around a University.
    29. OVER THE KNEE BOOTS Boots featuring high shafts that are designed to hit above the knee. May be flat or heeled. Read a book about an uptight/ conservative hero or heroine.
    30. PEEP TOE – A shoe with a narrow opening in the front that exposes the toes. Read a book where the h/h wear their heart on their sleeve or where they are activists of some kind.
    31. PENNY LOAFER – This wardrobe shoe staple has been around since the early 1930s. Read a book that takes place in the 20th century.
    32. PLATFORMS – A stage is a fancy platform. Read a book where the h/h are actors or performers (singers, magicians, musicians etc.) of some kind.
    33. POINTED TOE PUMPS – An enclosed shoe with a heel of any height. Read a book with an Alpha heel (hero) or read a book with a pointed message.
    34. RETRO – Style paying homage to the past. Read a book where the h/h work with history in some way (historian/archeology/remodeling)
    35. RIDING BOOTS– Horse racing is the sport of kings. Read a book where the h/h is a member of the nobility.
    36. SADDLE SHOE – A low-heeled Oxford-style shoe that is characterized by a saddle-shaped mid-foot panel. Read a book from any era in history where riding horses was the primary means of transportation.
    37. SANDAL – Quite possibly the oldest shoe known to man. Read a historical novel.
    38. SHAFT – The upper portion of a boot that covers the ankle and sometimes the leg. Read a book where the h/h have been “shafted” in some way (cheating former spouse, robbed of an inheritance etc.)
    39. SLING BACK – Read a time travel romance.
    40. SLIPPER – The ultimate comfort shoe. Read a cozy or sweet romance.
    41. SNOW SHOES – Winter wear. Read a romance that takes place primarily in the winter or that has a winter scene on the cover.
    42. SPECTATOR- Read a book with a quiet h/h or an h/h who observe life from the shadows.
    43. STEEL TOE – Read a book where the h/h is known for their strength or has endured a great trial (falsely imprisoned, debilitating sports or other injury) or where they have overcome a challenge of some kind (blindness, deafness, depression, cancer)
    44. STILETTO The ultimate girl shoe. Read a book about a girly girl, a perfect lady or a heroine who is either taller than average or described as shorter than average.
    45. SYNTHETIC – Many shoes are made of manmade materials these days. Read a book that is “fake” in some way, such as a fantasy, sci-fi, or alternate history romance.
    46. TENNIS SHOES – Originally worn while playing tennis but now popular off the courts. Read a fish out of water romance or a romance where the h/h have a barrier between them.
    47. WEDGE – A triangular, wedge-shaped heel that runs along the entire length of the foot. Read a book with a big misunderstanding.
    48. WINGTIP – Read a book about a pilot or stewardess.
    49. WORK BOOTS – Read a blue collar/working class romance.
    50. Did I miss a shoe? Make your own category!

    Maggie Boyd Maggie Boyd
    Participant
    Post count: 49

    Catchphrase Challenge based on famous TV catchphrases:Read 10,12 or 18 books that match the criteria within the challenge to complete it

    1. “Heeeere’s…Johnny!” Ed McMahon (the Tonight Show) Read a romance with a name in the title or read a series book about a family (such as Mary Balogh’s Huxtable series or Bedwyn saga).
    2. “Yada, yada, yada.” Seinfeld TV series (used by Elaine and George’s felonious girlfriend.) Read a book about anything – or nothing. This is a wildcard.
    3. “How you doin’?” Joey Tribbiani (Friends) Read a friends to lovers romance or a book(s) from a series based around a group of friends such as Jo Beverley’s Rogues
    4. “What’choo talkin’ ’bout, Willis?” Gary Coleman (Arnold Jackson Diff’rent Strokes) This show was all about making a major change in life. Read a rags to riches story, a makeover story or a fish out of water type story.
    5. “The tribe has spoken.” (Survivor) Read a book that is part of a series or where the h/h live in a tribal community.
    6. “And that’s the way it is.” (Walter Cronkite) This is a blast from the past. Read a historical novel.
    7. “Who are you wearing?” (Joan Rivers Golden Globes red carpet) Read a book that involves fashion in some way or a Regency romance that takes place during the Season (where all the fashionable people went).
    8. “Come on down!” (The Price Is Right) Only people who have to count their pennies count the cost. Read a book about a working class hero or heroine.
    9. “It’s gonna be legen — wait for it — dary.” Barney Stinson (Neil Patrick Harris How I Met Your Mother) Mr. Harris is out and proud. Read a LGBTQ romance or a romance based on a legend, fairy tale, classic novel or common romance trope.
    10. “Look! Up in the sky! It’s a bird! It’s a plane! It’s Superman!” — (Adventures of Superman) Read a romance about a pilot/stewardess/travel agent or someone who travels a lot for their job. Or read a book about a hero or someone who performs a heroic job.
    11. “One of these days.” — Ralph, (The Honeymooners) Read a time travel romance.
    12. “The thrill of victory and the agony of ­defeat.” — Jim McKay, (Wide World of Sports) Read a sports romance.
    13. “Danger, Will Robinson!” — Robot, (Lost in Space) Read an action/adventure romance or romantic suspense novel.
    14. “To the Batmobile!” — Batman(Batman) Read a romance about someone who works with cars: mechanic, race car driver etc.
    15. “This tape will self-destruct in five seconds.” — (Mission: Impossible) Read a romance where the characters work for a clandestine agency or private security firm/PI .
    16. “Live long and prosper.” — Spock, (Star Trek) Read a sci-fi romance or a romance where the characters are wealthy or a book with an elderly matchmaker.
    17. “Book ’em, Danno.” — McGarrett, (Hawaii Five-0) Read a romance with h/h who work in law enforcement.
    18. “Just one more thing…” — Columbo, (Columbo) The exceptionally smart and quirky detective, read a romance where the h/h is known for their intellect or originality.
    19. “Marcia, Marcia, Marcia!” — Jan, (The Brady Bunch) Read a romance about a middle sibling, where the h/h come from a large family or where jealousy plays a role or where the h/h play second fiddle to a more popular sibling/friend or a story about a wingman/ best man/bridesmaid.
    20. “Heigh Ho, Silver, Away!” The Lone Ranger (The Lone Ranger) Read a Western romance or a book with a cowboy, rancher or farmer.
    21. “Rolling Rolling Rolling Keep them doggies rolling, Rawhide!” (Rawhide) Read a book where the h/h have pets or an animal(s) is/are involved in some significant way.
    22. “Who loves ya, baby?” — Kojak (Kojak) Read a secret baby or pregnancy romance or a romance that refers to pregnancy/baby in the title such as Having the Billionaire’s Baby.
    23. “Dy-no-mite!” — J.J.,( Good Times) Read a romance with African American h/h or a romance that takes place in an urban locale.
    24. “Kiss my grits!” — Flo (Alice) Read a romance that takes place in the American south or a book about a waitress/cook/restaurant owner or restaurant worker.
    25. “Good night, John Boy.” — The Walton family (The Waltons) Read a romance that takes place in the 30s-50s or a small town romance, or a book where the h/h works in the news industry or is a writer.
    26. “Aaay!” — Fonzie (Happy Days) Read a motorcycle romance or a book where the h/h is in a gang. Since Happy Days presented an idealized version of the 50s, read an idealistic romance or since Fonzie dropped out of high school read a book about a high school dropout.
    27. “Up your nose with a rubber hose!” (Welcome Back, Kotter) Read a book with a teacher or where the h/h work in a school or work with kids in some way or read a book where the h/h has to go home.
    28. “What’s up, Doc?” Bugs Bunny (Looney Tunes) Read a romance where the h/h work in the medical industry in some capacity.
    29. “De plane, de plane!” — Tattoo,(Fantasy Island) Read a fantasy romance.
    30. “Oh, Goody!” Herman Munster, (Munsters) Read a paranormal romance.
    31. “Well, isn’t that special?” — The Church Lady, (SNL) Read an Inspirational romance.
    32. “That’s all I can stands, I can’t stands no more!” – Popeye (Popeye the Sailor) Read a book where the h/h are at rock bottom or in a desperate situation or a novel where the h/h is recouping from a lost job, lost career, major scandal etc.
    33. “Good grief.” – Charlie Brown, (Peanuts) Read a sad romance or a romance where the h/h is wrestling with grief.
    34. “And now, here’s something we hope you’ll really like.” – Rocky,(The Adventures of Rocky & Bullwinkle) Read a book from your favorite sub-genre or with your favorite trope.
    35. “Make it so.” — Picard, (Star Trek: The Next Generation) Read a book where the h/h make something for a living.
    36. “Resistance is futile.” — The Borg, (Star Trek: The Next Generation) Read a novel that’s received a lot of press, buzz etc. such as Fifty Shades of Grey or Outlander or that made one of the AAR Top 100 lists.
    37. “Oh, my God! They killed Kenny!” — Stan and Kyle, (South Park) Read a romance that revolves around a murder.
    38. “Will you accept this rose?” — (The Bachelor/The Bachelorette) Read a book with a meet-cute or meet-quirky premise or an arranged marriage book.
    39. “Everybody lies.” — House, (House) Read a book where deception plays a key role, such as a mistaken identity, girl dressed as boy book etc.
    40. “Clear eyes, full hearts, can’t lose.” — Coach Taylor, (Friday Night Lights) Read a sweet/heart string tugging type romance.
    41. “Bazinga!” — Sheldon, (The Big Bang Theory) Read a book with a genius or a humorous romance.
    42. “We’ve got a situation.” — Mike “the Situation” Sorrentino, (Jersey Shore) Read a book set around an unusual situation/with a unique plot point.
    43. “Missed me by that much.” Maxwell Smart (Get Smart) Have a book that comes close to one of these categories but doesn’t quite make the cut? Read that book.
    44. “Did I do that?” — Urkel, (Family Matters) Read a romance told from first person point of view.
    45. “Would have got away if it wasn’t for those meddling kids!” (Most Scooby-Doo villains, Scooby-Doo) Read a book where the h/h help catch a villain or bring about justice.
    46. “Th-th-th-that’s all folks!” Porky Pig, (Looney Tunes) Read the last book in a series
    47. “Is that your final answer?” — Regis Philbin, (Who Wants to Be a Millionaire?) Read that last book that finishes off the challenge.

    Sandlynn Sandlynn
    Participant
    Post count: 22

    Wow! You guys have been really busy here. Here’s an offering:

    ************************************
    Turning 18 years old affords one rights and responsibilities in many societies – some of which you would never think. Buy spray paint? Really? Anyway, for 2018, this is the:

    Rights and Responsibilities Challenge or The R&R Challenge for short!

    1) Ditch your curfew and drive all night.
    Read a romance that involves a road trip, or in which the first meeting or date between the protagonists involves a “one night stand,” or a romance set during a vacation.
    2) Get a tattoo or a piercing.
    Read a romance where one or both protagonists manipulates their body in an unusual way; for instance, is a changeling, a witch, a spirit guide, a time traveler or any other paranormal or fantastical character.
    3) Donate blood.
    Read a romance involving characters in the medical field in which one protagonist or both are doctors, nurses, EMTs, physical therapists, or work in some capacity for a hospital, clinic, or veterinary practice. Or read a romance in which one or both of our protagonists is suffering from an illness or is living with a disability.
    4) Get into extreme sports.
    Read a romance in which one or both of our leads works in any sports field, whether extreme or not. They can be athletes, trainers, managers, agents, coaches, sports medicine practitioners, etc.
    5) Buy fireworks.
    Read a romance involving either love at first sight or immediate dislike. Instant fireworks either way! Or, more prosaically, read a romance involving someone in the firefighting field.
    6) Buy spray paint.
    Read a romance involving a hero and/or heroine who works in the creative arts in some capacity – whether on the stage, the screen, the studio, the printed page, or the canvas.
    7) Buy cigarettes or tobacco.
    Read a romance where a character is saddled with an addiction or is overcoming or has overcome an addiction. Or, read a romance involving someone who lives on a farm, a ranch, or works in any type of agriculture … hopefully growing something healthier than tobacco!
    8) Sue someone.
    Read a romance involving characters in the legal field: lawyers, judges, police officers, detectives. Or read a romance in which one major character is suing another or threatening a law suit or legal action.
    9) Go to adult jail.
    Read a romance where either or both protagonists are being held against their will for some portion of the story, either in a physical sense, i.e., a jail, institution, or house arrest, or in a restrictive relationship, i.e., an abusive, demanding relative or employer.
    10) Be on a jury.
    A jury is a group of people who have to work together. In that spirit, read as many books as you want in a related series of romances involving a group of friends, associates, or family members.
    11) Enlist or be drafted.
    Read a romance in which one or more of the lead characters is in the military. Or read a romance set during a war at any time in history or in any fantastical world, either on the homefront or in battle.
    12) Be a stripper or go to a strip club.
    Read a romance in which one or both of the protagonists is considered to have an “unsavory” profession, pursuit, or lifestyle for their time … or any time. For instance, an actress in the 1800’s, a bootlegger in the 1920’s, a mistress or gigolo, a jewel thief or con artist, a muckraker or gossip columnist. It’s all relative!
    13) Try your luck at the lottery.
    Read a romance in which one or both protagonists works in the gambling industry or is a gambler. Or read a romance in which the hero or heroine has won a prize or has inherited something substantial – like land, a house, or a share of a business.
    14) Work more hours.
    Read a romance set at the work place, whether in an office or other place of business. The protagonists can be co-workers or have a less equal relationship.
    15) Open a bank account. Write a check. Get a credit card.
    Read a romance involving someone of extreme wealth, an heir or heiress or someone with a self-made fortune.
    16) Buy a car.
    Read a romance involving someone who works with vehicles of any type – pilots, racecar drivers, mechanics, chauffeurs, or someone who works with their hands, is in a blue collar profession, or works in tech (IT).
    17) Find your independence.
    Read a new adult romance. Or read a romance where one or both of the protagonists has just broken an engagement, gotten a divorce, or ended a live-in relationship with a significant other.
    18) Adopt a child.
    Read a young adult romance. Or read a romance in which one or both of the protagonists find themselves responsible for a child or children. If you’re into secret babies, here’s your chance to read that book! If you’re into pregnant heroines, feel free to take that book off your TBR pile!
    19) Pawn something.
    Read a romance in which one or both of the lead characters has little money or is in financial difficulties for a portion of the story. This can be an historical in which a titled person must marry for money or a chick lit novel where the heroine is eating ramen noodles every day.
    20) Change your name.
    Read a romance in which a lead character is in disguise, is pretending to be someone they are not, or is just not fully revealing who they are in order to maintain a relationship. Or, in the spirit of Romeo and Juliet, read a romance involving a relationship between two characters who are on opposite sides of feuding/warring families, groups, nationalities, or businesses.
    21) Vote.
    Read a romance involving one or more protagonists who are politicians at any level of government or who work for a cause — like the environment, homelessness, child welfare, abolition, prohibition, or suffrage.
    22) Get married.
    Read a romance set at a wedding or during activities surrounding a wedding. Or read a romance where the hero and heroine get married abruptly, for any reason or for any length of time.
    23) Buy porn.
    Read an erotic romance.
    24) Drink alcohol in most European countries and Canada.
    Read a romance set in Europe or in Canada. Or read a romance in which one or both protagonists works at or owns a bar, pub, brewery, distillery, or vineyard. Or, read a romance in which alcohol fuels the lead characters’ first encounter.
    25) Sign a lease. Sign a contract.
    Read a romance in which at least a portion of the story is told in the style of an epistolary novel. Or read a romance in which one or both lead characters is a reporter, editor, author or works in the publishing field. Or read a romance in which the two lead protagonists enter into any type of contract with each other, including a marriage contract or some other “understanding”.
    26) Get a passport — for 10 years!
    Read a romance involving travel to another country or to multiple countries or worlds by one or both protagonists, whether permanently or not, whether willingly or not.

    • This reply was modified 1 week, 2 days ago by Sandlynn  .
    • This reply was modified 1 week, 2 days ago by Sandlynn  .
    Sandlynn Sandlynn
    Participant
    Post count: 22

    Forgot to add the proviso … Read ten to 18 books based on the following criteria.

    Maybe we can slip that in when the thread is created.

    Maggie Boyd Maggie Boyd
    Participant
    Post count: 49

    Maybe we can slip that in when the thread is created.

    Yes, we can definitely do that :-).

    Maggie

    Maggie Boyd Maggie Boyd
    Participant
    Post count: 49

    Changed one of the challenge catchphrases.

    Catchphrase Challenge based on famous TV catchphrases:Read 10,12 or 18 books that match the criteria within the challenge to complete it

    1. “Heeeere’s…Johnny!” Ed McMahon (the Tonight Show) Read a romance with a name in the title or read a series book about a family (such as Mary Balogh’s Huxtable series or Bedwyn saga).
    2. “Yada, yada, yada.” Seinfeld TV series (used by Elaine and George’s felonious girlfriend.) Read a book about anything – or nothing. This is a wildcard.
    3. “How you doin’?” Joey Tribbiani (Friends) Read a friends to lovers romance or a book(s) from a series based around a group of friends such as Jo Beverley’s Rogues
    4. “What’choo talkin’ ’bout, Willis?” Gary Coleman (Arnold Jackson Diff’rent Strokes) This show was all about making a major change in life. Read a rags to riches story, a makeover story or a fish out of water type story.
    5. “The tribe has spoken.” (Survivor) Read a book that is part of a series or where the h/h live in a tribal community.
    6. “And that’s the way it is.” (Walter Cronkite) This is a blast from the past. Read a historical novel.
    7. “Who are you wearing?” (Joan Rivers Golden Globes red carpet) Read a book that involves fashion in some way or a Regency romance that takes place during the Season (where all the fashionable people went).
    8. “Come on down!” (The Price Is Right) Only people who have to count their pennies count the cost. Read a book about a working class hero or heroine.
    9. “It’s gonna be legen — wait for it — dary.” Barney Stinson (Neil Patrick Harris How I Met Your Mother) Mr. Harris is out and proud. Read a LGBTQ romance or a romance based on a legend, fairy tale, classic novel or common romance trope.
    10. “Look! Up in the sky! It’s a bird! It’s a plane! It’s Superman!” — (Adventures of Superman) Read a romance about a pilot/stewardess/travel agent or someone who travels a lot for their job. Or read a book about a hero or someone who performs a heroic job.
    11. “Same Bat time, Same bat channel” (Batman) Read a time travel romance.
    12. “The thrill of victory and the agony of ­defeat.” — Jim McKay, (Wide World of Sports) Read a sports romance.
    13. “Danger, Will Robinson!” — Robot, (Lost in Space) Read an action/adventure romance or romantic suspense novel.
    14. “To the Batmobile!” — Batman(Batman) Read a romance about someone who works with cars: mechanic, race car driver etc.
    15. “This tape will self-destruct in five seconds.” — (Mission: Impossible) Read a romance where the characters work for a clandestine agency or private security firm/PI .
    16. “Live long and prosper.” — Spock, (Star Trek) Read a sci-fi romance or a romance where the characters are wealthy or a book with an elderly matchmaker.
    17. “Book ’em, Danno.” — McGarrett, (Hawaii Five-0) Read a romance with h/h who work in law enforcement.
    18. “Just one more thing…” — Columbo, (Columbo) The exceptionally smart and quirky detective, read a romance where the h/h is known for their intellect or originality.
    19. “Marcia, Marcia, Marcia!” — Jan, (The Brady Bunch) Read a romance about a middle sibling, where the h/h come from a large family or where jealousy plays a role or where the h/h play second fiddle to a more popular sibling/friend or a story about a wingman/ best man/bridesmaid.
    20. “Heigh Ho, Silver, Away!” The Lone Ranger (The Lone Ranger) Read a Western romance or a book with a cowboy, rancher or farmer.
    21. “Rolling Rolling Rolling Keep them doggies rolling, Rawhide!” (Rawhide) Read a book where the h/h have pets or an animal(s) is/are involved in some significant way.
    22. “Who loves ya, baby?” — Kojak (Kojak) Read a secret baby or pregnancy romance or a romance that refers to pregnancy/baby in the title such as Having the Billionaire’s Baby.
    23. “Dy-no-mite!” — J.J.,( Good Times) Read a romance with African American h/h or a romance that takes place in an urban locale.
    24. “Kiss my grits!” — Flo (Alice) Read a romance that takes place in the American south or a book about a waitress/cook/restaurant owner or restaurant worker.
    25. “Good night, John Boy.” — The Walton family (The Waltons) Read a romance that takes place in the 30s-50s or a small town romance, or a book where the h/h works in the news industry or is a writer.
    26. “Aaay!” — Fonzie (Happy Days) Read a motorcycle romance or a book where the h/h is in a gang. Since Happy Days presented an idealized version of the 50s, read an idealistic romance or since Fonzie dropped out of high school read a book about a high school dropout.
    27. “Up your nose with a rubber hose!” (Welcome Back, Kotter) Read a book with a teacher or where the h/h work in a school or work with kids in some way or read a book where the h/h has to go home.
    28. “What’s up, Doc?” Bugs Bunny (Looney Tunes) Read a romance where the h/h work in the medical industry in some capacity.
    29. “De plane, de plane!” — Tattoo,(Fantasy Island) Read a fantasy romance.
    30. “Oh, Goody!” Herman Munster, (Munsters) Read a paranormal romance.
    31. “Well, isn’t that special?” — The Church Lady, (SNL) Read an Inspirational romance.
    32. “That’s all I can stands, I can’t stands no more!” – Popeye (Popeye the Sailor) Read a book where the h/h are at rock bottom or in a desperate situation or a novel where the h/h is recouping from a lost job, lost career, major scandal etc.
    33. “Good grief.” – Charlie Brown, (Peanuts) Read a sad romance or a romance where the h/h is wrestling with grief.
    34. “And now, here’s something we hope you’ll really like.” – Rocky,(The Adventures of Rocky & Bullwinkle) Read a book from your favorite sub-genre or with your favorite trope.
    35. “Make it so.” — Picard, (Star Trek: The Next Generation) Read a book where the h/h make something for a living.
    36. “Resistance is futile.” — The Borg, (Star Trek: The Next Generation) Read a novel that’s received a lot of press, buzz etc. such as Fifty Shades of Grey or Outlander or that made one of the AAR Top 100 lists.
    37. “Oh, my God! They killed Kenny!” — Stan and Kyle, (South Park) Read a romance that revolves around a murder.
    38. “Will you accept this rose?” — (The Bachelor/The Bachelorette) Read a book with a meet-cute or meet-quirky premise or an arranged marriage book.
    39. “Everybody lies.” — House, (House) Read a book where deception plays a key role, such as a mistaken identity, girl dressed as boy book etc.
    40. “Clear eyes, full hearts, can’t lose.” — Coach Taylor, (Friday Night Lights) Read a sweet/heart string tugging type romance.
    41. “Bazinga!” — Sheldon, (The Big Bang Theory) Read a book with a genius or a humorous romance.
    42. “We’ve got a situation.” — Mike “the Situation” Sorrentino, (Jersey Shore) Read a book set around an unusual situation/with a unique plot point.
    43. “Missed me by that much.” Maxwell Smart (Get Smart) Have a book that comes close to one of these categories but doesn’t quite make the cut? Read that book.
    44. “Did I do that?” — Urkel, (Family Matters) Read a romance told from first person point of view.
    45. “Would have got away if it wasn’t for those meddling kids!” (Most Scooby-Doo villains, Scooby-Doo) Read a book where the h/h help catch a villain or bring about justice.
    46. “Th-th-th-that’s all folks!” Porky Pig, (Looney Tunes) Read the last book in a series
    47. “Is that your final answer?” — Regis Philbin, (Who Wants to Be a Millionaire?) Read that last book that finishes off the challenge.

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