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  • library addict
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    Easy Eighteen Challenge (The Whittler) – Novellas
    The Snows of Windroven by Jeffe Kennedy:
    This was an angst-filled sequel to The Tears of the Rose (the second book of the earlier series) which tied up the lingering question of how the h/h’s relationship could work given their different statuses. Though the h/h were no doubt in love, the lack of effective communication and the fact he was an ex-convict and she a queen meant there were issues which needed to be dealt with on page. It was also nice to finally get the hero’s POV. The author did a good job of making both characters sympathetic even when they were frustratingly miscommunicating. A lovely story to start the new year.

    • Easy Eighteen Challenge (The Whittler) – Novellas: 1 down, 17 to go…
    library addict
    Participant
    Post count: 126

    The 18 in 18 Phonics Challenge
    E for enigma — Read a mystery romance or romantic suspense.
    Promise Not to Tell by Jayne Ann Krentz:
    The h/h both suffered from insomnia and other PTSD-related symptoms from a traumatic incident in their childhood. I liked that these issues were treated as just a part of each of their characters. They had good days and bad days, there was progress and set-backs but it never defined them. The mystery meandered and the romance sometimes took a backseat to the suspense, but overall it worked for the plot. The romance was solid. There was the usual dash of the family drama as well as plenty of humor and a nice cast of secondary characters. Hopefully we won’t have to wait over a year for the conclusion of the trilogy as we did for this second installment. Another enjoyable example of why JAK remains an autobuy author for me.

    E for epic — Read a fantasy romance
    Heart of Fire by Amanda Bouchet:
    I was disappointed in this final book in the Kingmaker Trilogy. I liked both the h/h and their romance in the earlier books, but the hero was given shockingly little to do this time around. Also too many of the world’s rules seemed to shift as needed to move the plot along. The changes were explained on page but still felt like a copout. There were a few parts I enjoyed but overall a very uneven read that seemed to go around in circles. The ending was blandly anti-climactic (can’t say more without major spoilers). I am sad we will apparently not get the hero’s sisters’ stories, particularly Jocasta’s, as well as his brother Carver’s.

    • Easy Eighteen Challenge (The Whittler) – Novellas: 1 down, 17 to go…
    • The 18 in 18 Phonics Challenge: 2 down, 16 to go…
    Sandlynn
    Participant
    Post count: 51

    Starting with The Alphabet Challenge Variation (read 18 books where the title/author name begins with the letter A, then B, C, etc. through R).

    Letter “R” for Alisha Rai

    During last year’s challenge, I read Alisha Rai’s first book in this series, Hate to Want You. This time, I delved into the second book, Wrong to Need You, also published in 2017. And, I have to say, this one is an improvement.

    The plot to Wrong to Need You picks up right after the first book, although I don’t think you need to read the first to appreciate this sequel. The story revolves around Sadia Ahmed and Jackson Kane. Sadia is the widowed sister-in-law of the heroine from Hate to Want You and Jackson is the twin brother of that heroine. So, obviously, Sadia is also Jackson’s sister-in-law. Sadia is from a Pakistani-American family of over achievers. However, she rebelled, left school, married young, and had a child. She now runs her deceased husband’s café, although her heart’s not in it, and she also bartends at night to supplement her income. Fortunately, she has a big enough family – including her former in laws – to help take care of her young son. Jackson – who is part Hawaiian, part Japanese — is the prodigal son of the Kane family, having run off after being accused of arson, even though that accusation was later retracted. He’s back in town to connect with his sister, but he’s never been comfortable at home and is looking for a fast exit. What stops Jackson from hitting the road is Sadia. They were friends when they were children and he always had a thing for her, although he never made that obvious and stepped out of the way when Sadia and his brother, Paul, started dating. He discovers that Sadia’s café is in need of a chef, and it just so happens that he *is* a chef – a very successful one who runs pop-up restaurants around the globe. Before you know it, Jackson is volunteering at Sadia’s café, living over her garage, and finally connecting with his young nephew. Although trying to keep a low profile, his presence stirs up the ghosts of the past in both his own family and that of his deceased father’s former business partner, bringing to light unsavory facts that were buried and feelings he’s had for Sadia. Conveniently – or not – Sadia’s libido is also being stirred by Jackson’s presence. The question is, could there be more between them and can their families accept that?

    While many of the basic details of this story were revealed to us in Rai’s first book, this one does a much better job of laying out the facts in a show, not tell, fashion. The story of the Kane family, their former partners, the Chandlers, and Sadia’s family, the Ahmeds, is laid out much better and is more engrossing here. Plus the protagonists are more sympathetic and vulnerable – especially Jackson. This book is full of relationships and not just sexual ones. Although sexy, the story spends a lot more time on building up the tension, which makes it more meaningful to the reader when Sadia and Jackson finally connect. The story also does a great job with other relationships, especially between Sadia and her four sisters. All in all, I liked this second book better than the first. I’d give it an A-, with a slight subtraction for some unnecessary character traits that made no sense to me, e.g., Sadia is bi-sexual? Why, when that never really factored in the story?

    *****
    The Alphabet Challenge Variation – 1 down, 17 to go

    library addict
    Participant
    Post count: 126

    The Alphabet Challenge Variation
    A =About That Kiss by Jill Shalvis:
    I had mixed reactions to this book. On the one hand, I liked the h/h and enjoyed their bantering and romance. On the other, I was never sure if were meant to treat the “suspense” elements seriously or not. The hero and his coworkers seemed to have an 80s TV action star affliction where they were injured on one page and then magically healed by the next chapter. The resolution to the mystery subplot felt disappointing (won’t say more to avoid spoilers). There was only one conflict keeping the h/h apart so their internal monologues often felt repetitive. Plus the conflict seemed dragged out with both characters making decisions seemingly more for plot purposes. There was a lot of humor and surprisingly little angst despite some heavy baggage. The h/h had a nice chemistry. Overall a fun read, but with plot issues.

    • Easy Eighteen Challenge (The Whittler) – Novellas: 1 down, 17 to go…
    • The 18 in 18 Phonics Challenge: 2 down, 16 to go…
    • The Alphabet Challenge Variation : 1 down, 17 to go…
    Sandlynn
    Participant
    Post count: 51

    Continuing with The Alphabet Challenge Variation (read 18 books where the title/author name begins with the letter A, then B, C, etc. through R).

    Letter “D” for Dating-ish

    For letter “D,” I decided to see what many were raving about and pulled out Penny Reid’s Dating-ish published in 2017. (I previously read her book, Neanderthal Seeks Human, which I gave a B+. I liked it enough to seek Reid’s other work out.)

    This book has been ably described in the AAR review posted here: https://allaboutromance.com/book-review/dating-ish-by-penny-reid/. However, I didn’t enjoy it quite as much. I can see what the reviewer sees in the story. It’s certainly very different and I appreciated all of that. In fact, I will list the things I liked about it first and then mention what made this less enjoyable for me.

    What I liked: I really enjoyed the two main characters and their courtship story. Matt, the hero, was adorable and Marie, the heroine, was smart enough to fall for him pretty quickly. Neither of these people were stupid, they just didn’t reveal enough to eliminate all doubts about each other … and of course if they did, the story would be very short. I loved their banter and I understood their insecurities. Another thing I loved was the opening of each chapter, which featured a little abstract about a real — I think — AI development that was fascinating. I was also interested in Matt’s research, which we only really hear about rather than “see.”

    What I didn’t like as much: I wasn’t as thrilled about something which I probably should’ve expected, i.e., the tired trotting out of a group of couples who are all beautiful, accomplished, terribly in love and protective of their women. The couples who are all friends. In regencies, these are the “secretive spy club,” “the devilish dukes,” “the penniless sisters,” “the wallflower duchesses.” I am not a fan of those series of books, nor am I of the contemporary version. I don’t mind stories about the different couples, but bringing them all together and having them interact was insufferably cutesy and confusing. They are all so similar — to me — that I had difficulty telling them apart. Can’t they have friends who are not all the same? Different ages, shapes, sizes, sex preferences, and ethnic backgrounds? You know, like real life in the city of Chicago. As for my second turn off — I guess this is more personal — but I found some of those practices Marie was trying out for her article to be downright creepy! Cuddling? Okay. That’s nice. But dry humping (isn’t that basically lap dancing?) and orgasm meditation?! Geez! I don’t know. And, to tell you the truth, the fact that the author did not have the characters actually go through with either of the latter in the story should tell us something, huh?

    In any event, I don’t know. The book clearly is very different. I liked much of it, but I didn’t love it. “B-“?

    *****
    The Alphabet Challenge Variation – 2 down, 16 to go (R, D…)

    library addict
    Participant
    Post count: 126

    The Alphabet Challenge Variation
    D = Dark in Death by JD Robb:
    Even after well over twenty years this series remains a read on release day must for me. The case wasn’t all that compelling, but the personal interactions between Eve and Roarke and Eve and the rest of the supporting cast made this one of the more enjoyable books of late. There were some unexpected developments for Nadine who has always been one of my favorite characters and it will be interesting to see where things go from here. While not quite an instant favorite, definitely in the top half of the series.

    • Easy Eighteen Challenge (The Whittler) – Novellas: 1 down, 17 to go…
    • The 18 in 18 Phonics Challenge: 2 down, 16 to go…
    • The Alphabet Challenge Variation : 2 down, 16 to go…
    Sandlynn
    Participant
    Post count: 51

    Onward with The Alphabet Challenge Variation (read 18 books where the title/author name begins with the letter A, then B, C, etc. through R).

    Letter “L” for Christina Lauren

    For letter “L,” I’m reading a story that my book group chose for this month, Christina Lauren’s “Dating You, Hating You,” published in 2017. Fortunately, I really enjoyed it.

    This is basically a work romance. It’s set in Los Angeles — Tinseltown specifically — although there’s not much glamour or star power here. The hero and heroine are rival talent agents, each attached to a prominent company in the business. We see them — unglamorously — doing their jobs as they navigate the office and gender politics of this cutthroat business. I have to say, I really felt like we were there in Southern California, in their world and I even tried checking to see if the authors are from there, they did it so well. Although our protagonists meet off-site, at a friend’s party, they soon learn they are in the same biz and, before long, actually working in the same company competing for the same position. This leads to comic moments, as they try to sabotage each other, but it also leads to some real life angst that grounded this story. The supporting characters are also well-drawn. Their evil boss is a little over the top. But their friends and colleagues were so distinct that I was rooting for many of them as well, especially the hero’s brother, a rock photographer with an artist’s heart. (Will he have his own story?)

    I’ve had this prejudice against authors who write together under one name, feeling like what they gain in collaboration, they lose in a distinctive voice. But, I was wrong here. I would never have been able to tell two authors are behind this work, it read so seamlessly — although they did shift chapters from hero to heroine which probably helped.

    Finally, this story has been compared to 2016’s breakout hit, The Hating Game, but to be honest with you, I like this one better. Because of some of the serious issues it tackled — in this time when women are finding their voice — it just seemed more au courant while also being humorous. I’d give it an “A.”

    *****
    The Alphabet Challenge Variation – 3 down, 15 to go (R, D, L …)

    Sandlynn
    Participant
    Post count: 51

    Continuing with The Alphabet Challenge Variation (read 18 books where the title/author name begins with the letter A, then B, C, etc. through R).

    Letter “J” for Eloisa James

    For letter “J,” I decided to read Eloisa James’ latest book, Wilde in Love, published in 2017.

    This story focuses on Lord Alaric Wilde who has been traveling the world, having daring adventures and writing about them which has made him a celebrity in his home country of England. Alaric’s travels, however, are not solely about adventure. He appears to be escaping a sad event in his life — the unfortunate death of a beloved older brother. Upon Alaric’s return to England and his rather large family, he unexpectedly meets a young woman who is a part of his society and is unique — she, Miss Willa Ffynche — has no interest in his fame and, in fact, is put off by it as she treasures her privacy and her more normal, quiet life. Of course, Willa is a part of the house party Alaric’s father throws, and Alaric and Willa are thrown together. Will Alaric be able to convince Willa that he also craves the normalcy that she prefers? Will Alaric’s legion of admirers undermine his goal, especially a particular woman who has made it her business to highlight his “infamy” and put herself foremost in the picture?

    Anyway, Eloisa James’ books have always been hit or miss with me. In this case, the book is more a miss than a hit. The problems I had were that the villainess started out to be quite interesting, but eventually ended up being the usual over-the-top, crazy other woman. The fact that she kept coming back, like The Terminator, really made me wonder about the intelligence of the people trying to keep her restrained. Take a woman scorned seriously, people!

    The other thing that was less enjoyable was the fact that almost all the activity occurred at one house party. Literally the setting never varied and I was disappointed that we never got a full feel for Alaric’s fame because he was, almost entirely, on his father’s estate. It just seemed that the plot was just stalled on that damn estate, with the cutesy animals, and somewhat claustrophobic. I would give this a B-, maybe even a C. What started out being a very interesting premise just boiled down to the same old, same old.

    *****


    The Alphabet Challenge Variation – 4 down, 14 to go (R, D, L, J …)

    library addict
    Participant
    Post count: 126

    The 18 in 18 Phonics Challenge
    G for guardian — Read a romance where the heroine and/or hero is on active duty with a military, naval, police, or fire-fighting organization. Or read a romance where the heroine and/or hero is a parent.
    Kansas City Cop by Julie Miller – heroine is a police officer:
    I had issues with the fact the hero was the heroine’s physical therapist as them becoming involved goes against the code of ethics. The mystery subplot was intriguing, but the fact the heroine was investigating her and her partner’s shooting while on medical leave and the hero was helping her kept throwing me out of the story. Especially because the cops in charge of the investigation did not mind. The heroine’s family problems too often felt forced, but I liked them even if they weren’t fully developed characters. I wish we’d seen more of the secondary romance with the hero’s business partner. I enjoyed parts of the mystery, but overall a disappointing read.

    The Catchphrase Challenge
    “Live long and prosper.” Spock, (Star Trek) – Read a sci-fi romance or a romance where the characters are wealthy or a book with an elderly matchmaker.
    Mateer by Veronica Scott – sci-fi Romance:
    The heroine woke up on an unknown planet horrified to find herself considered nothing but a lab rat to be experimented on by alien “scientists.” The hero was the second-in-command to the previous book’s hero. He broke into the facility where the heroine was being held and was none too happy about becoming a prisoner again after a few brief weeks of freedom. Once he met the heroine he decided she was his mate, but was understanding that she wasn’t too keen on the idea. The alien bad guys were the usual proverbial mustache-twirling evil, but that actually worked for the plot. There was more emphasis on the romance than in the previous book. I liked the h/h both individually and as a couple. Sections of the story seemed too contrived and there wasn’t much forward progress to the ongoing story arc but overall an enjoyable read.

    • Easy Eighteen Challenge (The Whittler) – Novellas: 1 down, 17 to go…
    • The 18 in 18 Phonics Challenge: 3 down, 15 to go…
    • The Alphabet Challenge Variation : 2 down, 16 to go…
    • The Catchphrase Challenge: 1 down, 17 to go…
    library addict
    Participant
    Post count: 126

    The 21st Century Challenge
    2001 = Harmless Error by Kate Donovan (published Oct 2001):
    It took me weeks to finish this book. I started it thinking it would be a romantic comedy but it opened with the trial of a child’s murder. The hero was overbearing. I realize this was an older book, but the way the hero’s mentor and others talked about the heroine was off putting. The heroine was judgmental and constantly jumped to conclusions. It didn’t help matters that the plot was so convoluted and eye roll inducing. I should have DNF’d but despite not buying into the romance I wanted to see how the “mystery” plot resolved. There were a few parts where I had hoped the book would get better, but they never lasted. Overall I wanted my time back and am mad at myself for having kept reading instead of just flipping to the end. Very disappointing.

    • Easy Eighteen Challenge (The Whittler) – Novellas: 1 down, 17 to go…
    • The 18 in 18 Phonics Challenge: 3 down, 15 to go…
    • The Alphabet Challenge Variation : 2 down, 16 to go…
    • The Catchphrase Challenge: 1 down, 17 to go…
    • The 21st Century Challenge : 1 down, 17 to go…
    Sandlynn
    Participant
    Post count: 51

    Continuing with The Alphabet Challenge Variation (read 18 books where the title/author name begins with the letter A, then B, C, etc. through R).

    Letter “A” for Acting on Impulse

    For letter “A,” I decided to read Mia Sosa’s, Acting on Impulse, published in 2017. Sosa is a new author to me and I have to say, I’m looking forward to picking up another of her stories in the future.

    Acting on Impulse begins on an airplane, making its way from Philadelphia to Aruba. Our heroine, Tori Alvarez, is a Philly fitness trainer who – on impulse – decides to take a short vacation after a public break-up with a boyfriend who is a former Olympian and a city councilman. To say the least, having any future relationship in the public eye is not for her. Our hero, unfortunately, is in the public eye, in a much bigger way than boyfriend #1. Carter Stone is a romantic comedy, sit-com actor who recently lost a lot of weight for a “serious” role and is hiding out in Philly trying to get his health back, maintain a low profile, and prepare for a press junket. Carter’s decision to take a time-out in Aruba also involved escaping recent unwanted publicity, after a doctor who had been monitoring his health sold the photos to a tabloid causing Carter to go ballistic. Tori and Carter “meet” on the plane and later in Aruba. Because he’s using his real name (Carter Williamson) and looks a bit like an emaciated drug addict, she doesn’t recognize him and he, enjoying the company of a woman who isn’t into him for his fame, delays relaying the truth. Of course, that bites him on the butt as Tori eventually realizes he’s been lying. Back in Philadelphia, Tori wants to have nothing to do with Carter, but Carter uses his need to get back into peak physical condition to pursue Tori as a trainer via her two bosses who own the gym she works from and are thrilled to have a celebrity as a client. Thus begins Tori and Carter’s burgeoning relationship.

    This story is about two people who have been burned in the past and are not as confident in their own skin as one might expect. Tori, who is also dealing with some estrangement from her Puerto Rican roots and her family’s reluctance to compromise their ways in order to move forward, is gun shy over a relationship that might swallow her whole and be more about PR than honest feelings. Carter – although seemingly more assured about Tori’s genuineness – is also skittish, since he’s been used in the past. Also, he’s dealing with a crisis of confidence in his work, as he’d like to take on more serious roles and get the respect he thinks he doesn’t have, but is having difficulty getting critical acceptance. So, this story does a good job of presenting these two as fully realized characters who don’t waste too much time doubting each other. The unlikely coincidences in the beginning of the story – him being in Philly and them both going to Aruba – are fortunately left behind. I also was surprised that the Philly entertainment media wasn’t as intrusive as I would’ve expected. But, I did love that the story was set in Philly – my hometown (or close enough) – and appreciated the diversity that being in a big city provided, from Tori’s Puerto Rican family to her African American boss. It was refreshing. I would give this story a B+.

    *****


    The Alphabet Challenge Variation – 5 down, 13 to go (R, D, L, J, A …)

    Sandlynn
    Participant
    Post count: 51

    Onward with The Alphabet Challenge Variation (read 18 books where the title/author name begins with the letter A, then B, C, etc. through R).

    Letter “G” for Jasmine Guillory

    For letter “G,” I read a book that was chosen by my book group, Jasmine Guillory’s The Wedding Date, published in 2018.

    This book has received a lot of advance attention and AAR even reviewed it twice, giving it rather average ratings. You can find the reviews here:
    https://allaboutromance.com/book-review/the-wedding-date-by-jasmine-guillory/
    https://allaboutromance.com/book-review/the-wedding-date-by-jasmine-guillory-2/

    Since both reviewers did an excellent job of describing the plot, I will skip that part of my comments and go right into my own views on the story.

    For me, I’m closer to the AAR reviewers’ grades of “C” and “C+” then I am to my book group members’ opinions which seemed much more positive. I just felt that Guillory’s overall story was kind of pedestrian. While our heroine, Alexa Monroe, was more fully realized, the hero had very little depth. We know nothing about his family and we know nothing about why he had such a fear of commitment. He just appears to be a serial monogamist, whose relationships, by design, only last a couple of months, period. It was hard, for me, to root for this couple when I just didn’t feel that the hero was written with enough substance to deserve her.

    The second thing that puzzled me was that this book focuses a good deal on this couple conducting a long distance relationship — with an emphasis on booty calls — without actually being very explicit about the booty. Now, I don’t need my sex scenes to be explicit and, in fact, I’ve become bored with many of these scenes in other books that are added “just because.” However, this story literally brushes over almost every single engagement, and there are a number of them! Others in my book group agreed with this observation and someone brought up that, in an interview, the author commented that her story was originally much sexier. However, her publisher asked her to tone it down. We surmised that the reasoning behind this was that the publisher wanted this book to appeal to a wider audience — a woman’s fiction as well as romance audience — and so the typical sexier elements you might find in a romance novel of this type were missing. I wonder if they’ve succeeded? For me, I’m not likely to be interested enough to read another book by this author unless she either builds up the plot/characters outside of the bedroom, makes the bedroom scenes more interesting, or ideally both. The Wedding Date has its moments, building up the heroine’s backstory and work issues and introducing the hero’s emotional connection to his patients, but they were not developed enough to override the lack of interest elsewhere.

    Maybe the author has to decide what type of book she wants to write and fight for it. I’d give this a B-/C.

    *******
    

The Alphabet Challenge Variation – 5 down, 13 to go (R, D, L, J, A, G …)

    library addict
    Participant
    Post count: 126

    The 21st Century Challenge
    2002 = A Noble Pursuit by Meg Lacey (published Feb 2002): The h/h had a one-night stand before he knew she was related to the man he was investigating. The heroine continued to lie when they met again. When she learned he was an undercover cop, she took umbrage that he was using her conveniently forgetting all of her own lies and the fact she had been using him to have an adventure. The plot was paint-by-numbers and the heroine’s brother got off way too easy. The wrong person did the groveling at the end. A very frustrating read.

    2003 = The Street Where She Lives by Jill Shalvis (published Oct 2003): I wanted to like this book, but couldn’t. The heroine had told the hero she didn’t love him and asked him to leave and was mad because he did. Fast forward thirteen years and he came back to town at their daughter’s request to care for the heroine as she recovered from a hit-and-run. There were major issues with the heroine’s unrealistic recovery. The plot had everything and the kitchen sink. The suspense plot had a horribly anticlimactic ending. I can’t list other complaints without major spoilers. I would have thrown the book at the wall if I had been reading a print edition and not digital. The characters and story had so much potential and ended up being such a disappointment.

    2004 = Storm of Seduction by Cindy Gerard (published May 2004): The hero started off as a condescending jerk. Thankfully he eventually got over himself. The heroine was a wildlife photographer. The hero was the CEO of a publishing empire. There were issues with the quasi-bear sanctuary plot, but I liked the heroine. I also had a few qualms with the compromise at the end of the story as I thought one of the characters conceded much more than the other. Some enjoyable parts and a lot of humor, but overall an average read.

    2005 = Her Good Fortune by Marie Ferrarella (published Feb 2005): The heroine was supposedly very close to her family, yet her mother didn’t know she was an alcoholic. The hero’s fiancée had died nearly twenty years ago while driving drunk, so he’d closed himself off emotionally. He and the heroine started on the wrong foot. I know we were supposed to find his attitude amusing at times, but he had a tendency to be very condescending and made a lot of assumptions which weren’t funny. The author did a good job of making me dislike each of them on the other’s behalf so the idea it was all really love at first sight just didn’t wash. The plot had them often trapped together to force them to interact, everything from a car accident to a blackout which caused the elevator to conveniently stop working. All of which made me doubt they would have a conversation if left to their own devices. But ultimately my main issue with this book was the behavior of the heroine’s mother and the hero’s father. Again we were supposed to find their matchmaking efforts amusing, but I really wanted the h/h to announce they were leaving the country with no forwarding address to get away from their horrible meddling.

    • Easy Eighteen Challenge (The Whittler) – Novellas: 1 down, 17 to go…
    • The 18 in 18 Phonics Challenge: 3 down, 15 to go…
    • The Alphabet Challenge Variation : 2 down, 16 to go…
    • The Catchphrase Challenge: 1 down, 17 to go…
    • The 21st Century Challenge : 5 down, 13to go…
    library addict
    Participant
    Post count: 126

    The Alphabet Challenge Variation
    C = Covert Game by Christine Feehan:
    The GhostWalkers remain my favorite series of Feehan’s even though I am not as invested in the later teams as the first two. After some much needed story advancement in the previous book, this book had a silly plot without any movement in the overall story arc. I liked the heroine, but the hero’s attitude that other women were all just gold diggers he used for sex reflected poorly on him. There were numerous sections with graphic violence that went on for entirely too long without contributing much to the plot. I would be interested in reading the leader of team four’s story, but I am pretty much over the rest of his team. The h/h’s romance felt like a repeat of others in the series. I enjoyed parts, but overall an uneven read.

    • Easy Eighteen Challenge (The Whittler) – Novellas: 1 down, 17 to go…
    • The 18 in 18 Phonics Challenge: 3 down, 15 to go…
    • The Alphabet Challenge Variation : 3 down, 15 to go…
    • The Catchphrase Challenge: 1 down, 17 to go…
    • The 21st Century Challenge : 5 down, 13to go…
    library addict
    Participant
    Post count: 126

    The 21st Century Challenge
    2006 = Eternal Nights by Patti O’Shea (published Aug 2006):
    I read the first book in this series for the 15 in 2015 challenge. Not sure why I let this one languish in my TBR for so long. The secondary couple from book one appeared again to resolve their storyline. There was also a small glimpse of the main couple from the previous book. The hero remembered his past life on the alien planet, but the heroine did not. The story bounced back and forth between the various characters which caused some pacing issues. Often the resolution to one of the jams the h/h found themselves in felt a bit deus ex machina, but that was a minor quibble. I enjoyed the main romance more than the dream flashbacks of their previous life, but I appreciated the emphasis that they were now very different people. I was very happy to get more of the secondary romance even with the OTT angst.

    Easy Eighteen Challenge (The Whittler) – Novellas
    The Troll Bridge by Patti O’Shea:
    This short novella read more like an excerpt than a complete story. The h/h spent an afternoon together so the quasi-HFN was more appropriate than a HEA. The previous books involved psychic abilities and reincarnations so the time-travel element didn’t bother me. It was the fact the author made absolutely no attempt to resolve unanswered questions, simply had the hero tell the heroine they’d figure something out (trying not to be too spoilery, but sheesh!). A very dissatisfying conclusion to the series.

    • Easy Eighteen Challenge (The Whittler) – Novellas: 2 down, 16 to go…
    • The 18 in 18 Phonics Challenge: 3 down, 15 to go…
    • The Alphabet Challenge Variation : 3 down, 15 to go…
    • The Catchphrase Challenge: 1 down, 17 to go…
    • The 21st Century Challenge : 6 down, 12 to go…
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