Books by Elizabeth Lowell

A
Too Hot to Handle

Too Hot to Handle just hurts so good. Know what I mean? The hero is very nearly a total S.O.B.; the heroine subjected to torture nearly beyond belief. The love scenes are filled with incredibly purple prose. The incendiary heat between Tory Wells and Ethan Reever begins, nearly impossibly, the momen ...

C-
Granite Man

I think I've just overdosed. I've hit my limit. And it was Granite Man who did it. What limit? My tolerance quota for over-the-top, arrogant, know-it-all, harder than hard, tougher than tough, mean-spirited, hurtful alpha heroes. By the middle of this book, I knew exactly what was coming, exactly ho ...

B+
Love Song For A Raven

Love Song For A Raven is a Mira reprint of a 1987 Elizabeth Lowell Silhouette Desire title. It is a moody character-centered story set in the Queen Charlotte Islands. Janna Morgan is an artist who has come to the islands for inspiration, and to recover from the break-up of her mar ...

A-
To the Ends of the Earth

I have to say it - a few pages in to this book, and I became obsessed with it. If I put it down, I was edgy until I could pick it up again. When I had to go to bed, I dreamed about it. When I had to go to work, I seriously considered calling in sick just so I could finish it. I don't recollect any b ...

C+
Fever

Elizabeth Lowell books are one of my guilty pleasures. I know when I get one of her older novels, I am in for some serious sensuousness. Characters? Well, the man is usually (hell always!) scarred, bitter, does not like women, thinks they're all money grubbing vixens who only want to get their perfe ...

D
Fire and Rain

Elizabeth Lowell and I sort of have a win-some, lose-some relationship. When she's hot, she's hot (and how!), and when she's not, well, you get Fire and Rain. I've read several of the books in the Western Man series (since they are mostly reissues, I have no idea which came first or in what order I ...

B-
Warrior

In every Elizabeth Lowell I've ever read, the hero has always pinned a nickname on the heroine - "little cat," "sunshine," "schoolgirl," "city girl" among them - that serve to emphasize the hero's adult-ness and the heroine's youth and assumed helplessness (and indeed, this has sometimes been the ca ...