Gothic

C
The House In Thornton Wood

The cover of The House In Thornton Wood features a young woman enveloped in a cloak and hood in the foreground of a dark and brooding landscape complete with a shadowy mansion. Let's read the blurb on the back cover, hmm, we have a governess, an isolated house, a mysterious woods, gypsies, mystery, ...

C+
The Shadowing

The Shadowing by Joan Overfield is a very gothic experience. While I found the book engrossing and the heroine interesting, the book's over-the-top melodrama was a little difficult to take. In the fifteenth century, an evil sorcerer cursed the McCairn lairds with the Shadowing. At some point ...

D
Whispers of Goodbye

I have nothing against books written from the first person point of view. As a matter of fact, many of my all-time favorites are written in the first person. But in the case of Whispers of Goodbye, it did not help the story one bit. The story opens with Catherine de Claire Reed liv ...

D
Fire and Ice

One of my favorite novellas of all time is Anne Avery's A Dance on the Edge. Unfortunately, the poignancy and emotion of that work was nowhere to be found in Fire and Ice, the story of a young woman in the Depression era who returns home in search of her mother's legacy and finds herself plunged bac ...

C
The Scarletti Curse

After having read The Scarletti Curse, the question comes to mind once again, why do writers write, and why do readers read historicals? What is the difference between a story set in centuries past as opposed to modern times if not to emphasize some aspect of history? Do the rules change in an his ...

D+
Devil in the Dark

I appreciate a good Gothic romance; as a teenager I cut my reading teeth on the works of Mary Stewart, Victoria Holt, and Phyllis A. Whitney. So I welcomed the news that LoveSpell was going to publish a line devoted to Gothics. But I gotta tell you, if Devil in the Dark is any indication of quality, ...

A
The Hidden Hand

Romance readers look to Jane Austen and Charlotte Bronte as writers whose books were ancestors to today's modern romance novels. In addition to these wonderful British ladies, I would like to propose a work by a 19th century American woman writer. This book features a character who was wildly popula ...