Reviews by Rike Horstmann

B
Kids on the Doorstep

Kimberly Van Meter writes contemporary romances set in the fictional small town of Emmett’s Hill, in the California Sierra Nevadas. And it’s the first small town I’ve read about in recent history in which the residents look out for each other, but in which they are really nasty towards the out ...

B-
Fire at Midnight

Fire at Midnight by Lisa Marie Wilkinson spent some time on my bedside table. In this case, it was all for the best, because the book contains a number of elements that might have distracted me at another time, but because I read it in the right mood, I had a lot of campy fun. At th ...

B-
Someone Like Her

Someone Like You is the first novel by Janice Kay Johnson I have ever read. Although I found it extremely well-written for the most part, some elements seriously annoyed me, which led me to lower the grade. Lucy Peterson owns and cooks for a café in her small hometown of Middleton. A ...

D
The Virgin's Secret

Victoria Alexander’s new series about three aristocratic brothers (what’s new?) is a sequel to her earlier The Perfect Wife, set four generations later in the same family. I chose to review it because the plot revolves about explorers and ancient artifacts, elements I usually like, but this nove ...

B
A Hint of Wicked

Jennifer Haymore’s debut novel, A Hint of Wicked, is another romance with an older and more experienced heroine – in this case, not a widow, but a lady who suddenly finds herself with two husbands. While this basic plotline is reminiscent of Mary Balogh’s Tangled (down to the detail that the t ...

B
Mercy Street

Mariah Stewart was a completely new author for me, and as I read Mercy Street, the first novel in a new series by her, I was delighted to find it a very pleasant read. The novel begins with Robert Magellan, a dot-com multimillionaire whose wife and infant son disappeared more than a year ago. His ...

C-
Enchanting the Beast

Enchanting the Beast by Kathryne Kennedy is the third volume in a series set in an alternate Victorian England. Social status is determined by magical abilities: The strongest magicians are members of the royal family, the weakest are still barons (or baronesses – a woman who has magical abilities ...

F
The Decadent Duke

The Decadent Duke by Virginia Henley fails to quite an amazing degree. In its conception, it is actually quite an ambitious and potentially interesting project. Instead of making up the umpteenth Duke of Ravenhawk, his brother Lord Devlin Hunter and the beauteous Lady Samantha de Vere, desired by bo ...

A-
Then Comes Seduction

When I asked for Mary Balogh’s Then Comes Seduction for reviewing, I had not read the first book in the series, First Comes Marriage. Fortunately my copy arrived soon after, and I read it with great enjoyment. I also read the teaser from Then Comes Seduction, but with far less satisfaction. In fac ...

B
Ruby's Slippers

I haven’t read an inspirational in years, mostly because the only inspirational I had read was drearily conservative and written in such a cheesy and sentimental way that it put me off the subgenre altogether. So it was with some trepidation I approached Ruby’s Slippers by Leanna Ellis, which is ...