Reviews by Pat Henshaw

B+
Lady Sarah's Son

By
I don’t usually like books with cute, precociously sweet children in them. Maybe it’s because as a mother and grandmother, I know how quixotic children really are, and many novels I’ve read would have me believe children are always cute and cuddly little angels all the time. That’s why I ...

A
Sing My Name

Sometimes I crave a saga, something long and involved like Diana Gabaldon’s Outlander that seems to go on and on. Only instead of time travel set in Britain, I’d like something set in the old West. Fortunately, new writer Ellen O’Connell has stepped up to fill the bill, and I can’t wait for ...

D
Compromised Hearts

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Redeeming a rogue can be very difficult if an author paints the guy as despicable and doesn’t give a good enough back story to make his errant behavior seem reasonable. Such a rogue is Cloud Ryder, the love interest in this novel. Cloud is like sailors who have a girl in every po ...

B+
Chasing the Sun

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Coming to the end of an enjoyable saga is like bidding far-flung relatives and friends goodbye after a holiday or vacation. If the reader is immersed in the tale, tears and a feeling of sorrow follow the turning of the last page. And that’s exactly how I felt reading the last paragraph of the Wilk ...

D-
When Lightning Strikes

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It’s not often that authors try the old bait and switch in their books, but when they do, I get livid. First of all, I absolutely hate it when the blurb and the genre tell me one thing, but the book itself is not what is promised. It’s like finding Jane Eyre promoted as science fiction or Prid ...

A
A Reason to Live

My Desert Island Keepers are those in which the author has given me something to think about beyond the romance and the two people involved. A Reason to Live does that by extending what could be an ordinary on-the-road story into a commentary essential to all of us. In fact, McKade’s entire ser ...

A-
Me Before You

We call the male protagonist in a romance the "hero." But what is a hero and what is a heroic life? That's just one of the many questions Moyes' book poses to her readers in this story that tips the scales into the incredibly weepy zone. The plot is fairly simple: Twenty-six year old British work ...